BOARD BIOGRAPHIES

Sarah Burns, JD

Sarah Burns, JD

President

Sarah Burns is a Professor of Clinical Law at New York University School of Law. She supervises the Reproductive Justice Clinic, which represents clients throughout the United States in litigation and policy projects centering on reproductive decision making. Burns is Executive Director of Washington Square Legal Services, the nonprofit entity under which most NYU Clinical Law Programs practice law. Burns also co-founded and oversees the Mediation Clinic and the Litigation, Organizing & Systemic Change Clinic, conducted in partnership with Make the Road NY and Center for Popular Democracy. Burns combines law with learning in social science to develop effective solutions for problems that institutions and communities face. Burns, who has been on the NYU faculty since 1990, specializes in experiential learning pedagogy, developing simulation and clinical courses in litigation, negotiation, mediation, policy advocacy, and systemic change. Burns began her law practice as a litigating attorney with the Washington, DC., commercial law firm Covington & Burling, representing industry associations in federal regulatory matters that Burns cites as “a key introduction to interest-based and advocacy legal practice so central to all negotiation and coalition work—whether in for-profit or not-for-profit/NGO sectors.” Burns later moved into public interest civil rights practice, undertaking litigation, legislative, and policy advocacy work. She has worked nationwide on cases in federal and state courts, and has advised legislative and regulatory initiatives. Burns graduated in 1979 from Yale Law School, where she edited the Yale Law Journal, and holds master’s degrees from Stanford University in sociology and the University of Oklahoma in human relations.


Nancy R. Aries, PhD

Nancy R. Aries, PhD

Secretary

Nancy Aries is a Professor of Public Policy at Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Baruch College. She has held several administrative positions including Interim University Dean for Undergraduate Education and most recently Director of the Baruch Honors Program. Her areas of research have included women’s reproductive health services and policies, the hospital workforce diversity, and the economic impact of biomedical research. She is currently studying the racial divide in higher education policy and practice. Recognition that teaching can be transformative led her to be trained as a facilitator at the Institute for Intergroup Dialogue and to organize Creative Inquiry Day, Baruch’s celebration of student research and creative endeavors.


Hytham M. Imseis, MD

Hytham M. Imseis, MD

Treasurer

Dr. Imseis is a Maternal-Fetal Medicine Specialist practicing in Charlotte, North Carolina. His career has been dedicated to caring for and advocating for pregnant women. He is very involved in the medical education of Obstetrician/Gynecologists across the United States for which he has won many teaching awards. He currently serves on the Women’s Executive Board and the Ethics Committee at his hospital and has served as the Medical Director of the Mountain Area Perinatal Substance Abuse Program and the Mountain Area Health Education Teen Pregnancy Clinic. Dr. Imseis has published research articles in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and in Obstetrics and Gynecology and currently reviews manuscripts for publication in both the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Khiara M. Bridges, JD, PhD

Khiara M. Bridges, JD, PhD

Khiara M. Bridges is a Professor of Law at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has written many articles concerning race, class, reproductive rights, and the intersection of the three. Her scholarship has appeared or will soon appear in the Harvard Law Review, Stanford Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the NYU Law Review, the California Law Review, the Michigan Law Review, and the Virginia Law Review, among others. She is also the author of three books: Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization (2011), The Poverty of Privacy Rights (2017), and Critical Race Theory: A Primer (2019). She is a co-editor of a reproductive justice book series that is published under the imprint of the University of California Press. She graduated as valedictorian from Spelman College, receiving her degree in three years. She received her J.D. from Columbia Law School and her Ph.D., with distinction, from Columbia University’s Department of Anthropology.


Julie Ehrlich, JD

Julie Ehrlich, JD

Julie Ehrlich (she/her) is the Director of Presidential Initiatives and Chief of Staff at the Mellon Foundation, where she partners with the president to identify, create strategies for, and execute hallmark grant-making initiatives, including The Monuments Project, the Puerto Rico initiative, and Imagining Freedom (supporting work at the intersection of the arts and humanities and the criminal legal system). As Chief of Staff, she is as a counselor and key resource to the Foundation’s president on administrative and programmatic strategy, internal governance and leadership, and major Foundation initiatives. Previously, Julie was assistant dean for strategic initiatives and chief of staff, executive director of the Birnbaum Women's Leadership Network, and adjunct professor of clinical law and co-instructor of the Reproductive Justice Clinic at NYU School of Law. Prior to joining NYU Law in 2014, Julie was a civil rights litigator for nearly a decade. She began her legal career as a staff attorney/fellow in the ACLU Women's Rights Project, and then clerked for Judge Nina Gershon in the Eastern District of New York and Judge Robert D. Sack on the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Julie holds a BA in American Studies from Yale University, and a JD from NYU, where she received a Hays Fellowship in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties and the Maurice Goodman Memorial Prize for Scholarship and Character.


Carl Hart, PhD

Carl Hart, PhD

Dr. Carl Hart, PhD is the Chair of the Department of Psychology and the Dirk Ziff Professor of Psychology (in Psychiatry) at Columbia University. Dr. Hart is a leading researcher on issues of drug use and dependency. He is the author of High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society. He is the winner of the 2014 PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award.


Carmelyn P. Malalis, JD

Carmelyn P. Malalis, JD

Carmelyn P. Malalis (she/her) is the former Chair and Commissioner of the New York City Commission on Human Rights, the agency tasked with combating discrimination in New York City. During her tenure, the NYC Human Rights Law was amended over 20 times to expand protections in the City, and the Commission was known for its aggressive law enforcement, creative approaches to education and outreach, a strong commitment to restorative justice principles, and outreach to historically underserved and marginalized communities throughout the City. Prior to her appointment, Ms. Malalis was a partner at Outten & Golden LLP where she co-founded and co-chaired its Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Workplace Rights Practice Group. While at the firm, she successfully represented employees in negotiations, agency proceedings, and litigation involving claims of sexual harassment, retaliation, and discrimination based on race, national origin, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, age, pregnancy, disability, and religion. She is a frequent speaker and commentator on human rights and issues involving diversity, equity, and inclusion; has held various leadership positions within the New York City Bar Association, the American Bar Association, and other bar associations; and is the recipient of numerous awards for her commitment to championing the rights of LGBTQIA, BIPOC, immigrant, and religious communities.


Ria Tabacco Mar, JD

Ria Tabacco Mar, JD

Ria Tabacco Mar (she/her) is the Director of the ACLU's Women's Rights Project. Previously, she was an attorney with the ACLU's Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender & HIV Project, where she led the ACLU's team in Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. In the case, a same-sex couple was refused a wedding cake because they are gay. Ria is a frequent commentator on gender justice issues and has been recognized on The Root 100 annual list of the most influential African Americans ages 25 to 45 and as one of the Best LGBT Lawyers Under 40 by the National LGBT Bar Association.


Jennifer L. Morgan, PhD

Jennifer L. Morgan, PhD

Jennifer L. Morgan is Professor of History in the department of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University where she also serves as Chair. She is the author of "Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in the Making of New World Slavery" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004) and the co-editor of "Connexions: Histories of Race and Sex in America" (University of Illinois Press, 2016). Her research examines the intersections of gender and race in the Black Atlantic world. Her newest work, "Reckoning with Slavery: Gender, Kinship and Capitalism in the Early Black Atlantic" considers colonial numeracy, racism and the rise of the trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in the seventeenth-century English Atlantic world and is forthcoming in Spring, 2021 with Duke University Press.

Her recent journal articles include "Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Law, Race, and Reproduction in Colonial Slavery," in Small Axe; "Accounting for 'The Most Excruciating Torment': Trans-Atlantic Passages" in History of the Present; and "Archives and Histories of Racial Capitalism" in Social Text. In addition to her archival work as a historian, Morgan has published a range of essays on race, gender, and the process of "doing history." Most notably, "Experiencing Black Feminism" in Deborah Gray White's edited volume "Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower" (2007). Pregnancy Justice was introduced to Professor Morgan by her father, John Morgan, a drug policy reformer and leader in research and writing regarding the effects of criminalized drugs.


Karen Sauvigné

Karen Sauvigné

Karen Sauvigné is a pioneer in the fight against sexual harassment in employment. While on the Cornell University faculty in the mid-1970s, she was part of a team that organized a “Speak-Out” in Ithaca, a kind of public consciousness raising against sexual exploitation at work. To give the phenomenon a name, they coined the term “Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.” She and her colleagues at Cornell gave voice to women whose previous experience had no expression.

Ms. Sauvigné has served as Director of Education in the Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Care at Mount Sinai and is co-author of several landmark publications on geriatrics competencies for medical trainees. Before going to Mount Sinai, she held faculty and management positions at Cornell, CUNY Law School, John Jay College, and Baruch College.

Until 2016 she chaired the board of Callen-Lorde Community Health. Ms. Sauvigné has also taught Leadership, Organizational Development and Strategic Management as graduate faculty at Baruch College, CUNY. In addition, she has served as Executive Director of the Legacy Foundation, was on the founding team at CUNY Law School, and has served on the Boards of the Asian American Legal Defense Fund, the Public Interest Law Foundation, San Simeon Health and Nursing Center, and Cornell’s Institute for Women and Work, as well as NYC’s LGBT swim team, where she ran operations for Gay Games Swimming in 1994. Karen currently serves as Chair of the Grants Committee for the North Fork Women for Women Fund.